Home Tips for comedians

Tips for comedians

5 Reasons Comedian Newsletters May Become Bigger Than Comedy Podcasts

Not so long ago, most comics had never heard of podcasts, let alone had one of their own. Oh, how things change. Social media evolves at such a rapid pace that it’s difficult to keep up to date with the latest opportunities, let alone get ahead of them in a manner that allows you to capitalize on them. For example, the boom in comedy podcasts over the past couple years created incredible, career-altering opportunities for comedians – but mostly for comics who were “early” on the podcast boom. Guys like Marc Maron, Adam Carolla, and others built podcast empires by combining their talents with a good sense of timing – they saw the potential in the format before the rest of the comedy world and capitalized on it. While predicting the future is certainly a crapshoot, I also felt like I saw the podcast boom coming several years before it exploded. And now, I feel like I’m seeing a similar set of circumstances bubbling up that leads me to believe there’s a new boom coming. This time arou..

7 Things You Can Learn From Dave Foley Of Kids In The Hall

7 Things You Can Learn From Dave Foley Of Kids In The Hall

This is a guest post from Connected Comedian David Gavri, a Chicago comic and comedy writer who also publishes interviews with comedians on his Gonzo Fame website. If you’d like to contribute a guest post to Connected Comedy, please email me. A founding member of the comedy troupe Kids In The Hall, Dave Foley has had a long and successful career as a standup comedian, actor, and writer. He recently appeared at a Q&A held at Second City in Chicago where he was interviewed by Katie Rich and shared the following advice for comedians about the challenges of writing and creating comedy. 1. Sometimes The Best Ideas Come When You’re NOT Writing When it came to writing sketches with Kids In The Hall, Foley explained that typically the group’s most successful ideas came when they weren’t actually trying to write at all, but rather when they were just hanging out together. “The best ideas come when you’re NOT writing,” he said. “We spent an awful lot of time watching MTV videos and saying stu..

5 Reasons Comedian Newsletters May Become Bigger Than Comedy Podcasts

5 Things You Can Learn From Gabriel Iglesias

Gabriel Iglesias recently appeared on an episode of Marc Maron’s WTF podcast where he discussed the evolution of his career and how he’s grown into one of the biggest headliners in the country. But most importantly for up and coming comics, he explained how he approaches marketing and branding himself in a way that has helped separate him from the rest of the crowd. You can listen to the full episode here, or read up on some of the highlights below. 1. Be Easy To Remember – And Consistent At around the 17-minute mark, Iglesias explains that he embraced the nickname “Fluffy” early on because he realized that nobody that saw him was remembering his name. So, he decided to incorporate the nickname Fluffy into his act and into everything he did from a marketing perspective, recognizing that it was more memorable than his name. “It branded me,” he says. Iglesias’ branding didn’t stop with his nickname. Early on he also made a conscious decision to maintain a consistent look – in his cas..

5 Reasons Comedian Newsletters May Become Bigger Than Comedy Podcasts

Embrace That Niche (Connected Comedy Podcast Episode 57)

Please subscribe and rate this podcast on iTunes! On the “nichiest” episode of the podcast, Jordan Cooper and Josh Spector talk about narrowing the focus of your career towards a target audience, concentrating on that one thing that’s unique and different about you, how consumers have become fragmented and are gravitating to niches over broad media, how advertisers are putting more effort in reaching engaged audiences rather than large ones, and why ‘artisanal’ e-mail newsletters may be the next big wave of building and cultivating a fan base. In addition, Jordan discusses the strategic plans of his podcast over the past two years, how it shows the power of placing yourself in the position to get opportunities, the importance of putting as much effort into community engagement as you do creating the content, and why setting goals with timeframes can help determine how you’re defining “success” in your comedic endeavors. Links from this episode: Blenderhead Podcast #39: Never Go Ful..

5 Reasons Comedian Newsletters May Become Bigger Than Comedy Podcasts

15 Things Comedians Should Be Thankful For

In honor of Thanksgiving, let’s take a break from the negativity and struggle that permeates so much of the conversation about the comedy business and remember that there’s actually a lot of things for comedians to be thankful for these days. Whether you’re an established comic, or somebody just starting out, here’s 15 things I think are worth taking a moment to appreciate in the next few days. 1. Your Fans Whether you’ve got thousands of fans or just your Mom hanging on your every word, you should truly appreciate each and every one of the people who care enough to pay attention to what you create. We’re living in a world where there’s never been more competition for a person’s attention, and it’s honestly a miracle when anybody is willing to consistently give you some of theirs. 2. Free Social Media Tools For all the bitching that people do about social media platforms it’s easy to forget how many incredible tools have been provided to comedians at no cost. YouTube, Facebook, Twit..

5 Reasons Comedian Newsletters May Become Bigger Than Comedy Podcasts

5 Things You Can Learn From Canada’s Biggest Comedy Club Owner

Mark Breslin is the CEO and Founder of Yuk Yuk’s, a chain of 15 comedy clubs across Canada, and a comedy entrepreneur who has spent decades building an empire. On a recent episode of the Industry Standard with Barry Katz podcast, Breslin discussed a wide variety of topics ranging from how he got into comedy in the first place, what he’s learned, and what advice he has for up and coming comics today. It’s a great conversation and you can listen to the full episode here or read up on some of the highlights below. 1. It Helps To Start Outside Of New York Or LA At around the 19-minute mark, Breslin shares some interesting thoughts on the role of the town in which a comic first starts their comedy career. “It’s very advantageous to be outside the center of action to develop,” he says, referencing the upside of honing your craft some place other than comedy business hubs like New York or Los Angeles. “Most comedians in New York and LA got great somewhere else first.” But Breslin also ack..

5 Reasons Comedian Newsletters May Become Bigger Than Comedy Podcasts

7 Things You Should Know About The New York Comedy Scene

This is a guest post from Connected Comedian Tom Cowell, who has lived in New York City for the past 8 years and performed stand-up comedy there for the past five. If you’d like to write a guest post with an overview of your local comedy scene for Connected Comedy, please email me. 1. You Can Drink In A Lot Of Open Mics…But Also Drown In Them There are over 160 open mics in New York City, and that’s just counting the ones listed on Bad Slava. There are dozens more that aren’t advertized – you just learn about them if you live here. Getting up multiple times every night is easy if you’re willing to pay $3-$5 for five minutes of stage time (common in Manhattan). And you can get up multiple times a night for free with just a little planning. When you first move to (or start doing comedy in) New York, you won’t get booked much. So by all means: go nuts with mics. It’s a point of pride for most New York comics that they went through that “three or four mics a night” phase for a while. Y..

5 Reasons Comedian Newsletters May Become Bigger Than Comedy Podcasts