Home comedynews Comedy is Dying. . . . they say
Comedy is Dying. . . . they say

Comedy is Dying. . . . they say

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There’s three ways to tackle a complicated subject; Walk away. Yup, just admit inferiority and move on from the conversation.  OR, you can go in-depth with facts, figures, dates and points of reference. OR, you can lean on the words of others, which is our choice for today. We’re taking the easy way out because we’re still on mental vacation and slightly hung-over (it be like that sometimes). Our complicated subject, the current state of stand-up comedy. Some think its dying, we disagree.

Who thinks its dying? A handful of old comics, people who like to complain, and people who’ve had their feelings hurt or paradigms shifted. We understand ‘old comics’ sometimes say things to prevent said thing from happening (see Jerry Seinfeld’s comments about Comedy)

Why is it complicated? Most people in, and around the industry have differing opinions of its sustainability. Some say its a dying artform, some say its overrated, some say its being bastardized by the internet and social media. Others (like us at TheySoFunny.com), think comic-on-comic hate muddies the water, to which we agree. It’s especially bad when our most influential comedian hates all comedians. Donald Trump has made life hard for comics.

Political correctness has also thrown darts at stand-up comedy and complicated the art form. Many say stand-up comedy has been a license to be racist, homophobic, sexist and discriminatory, the latest example of this was the Kevin Hart versus the Oscars debacle. Luckily for comedy, this hasn’t diminished his starpower (see survey) This has caused many comics to dilute their material (See DeRay Davis). While those points of view presents a ‘cross-roads’ for stand-up comedy, it will not kill the art.

 

After Tiffany Haddish bombed her New Years Eve show in Miami, the notion of stand-up comedy dying has resurfaced. We disagree, as does Roy Wood Jr.

For years veteran comics have complained of “socialmedians” (the men and woman whose claim to fame is social media posts and videos) and fly-by-night comedians (see Luenell versus NeNe Leakes). We won’t call any names, but behind closed doors we’ve heard vets complain about socialmedians not putting in dues, not being ready for the stage, and not being true ‘comics.’ They claim these people hurt the business and will ultimately kill comedy, to which we disagree. These people are actually keeping the game alive. While Socialmedians are not “trained” comics, many are funny, therefore they can be considered Comedians. That’s what its about, right? It’s a blessing and a curse but being funny is the only pre-requisite for comedy. This means you’ll have more failures than successes, but you’ll also find unexpected gems in dark clubs on off-nights.

 

 

So, as we conclude this limited review of comedy’s complicated state of being, we leave you with this:

 

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